Faizan Agha, manager of advanced product development for Hyundai Canada, accompanies Black Press reporter Tom Fletcher on a test drive in the prototype Hyundai Nexo hydrogen fuel cell sport utility. (Arnold Lim/Black Press)

Hydrogen vehicles entering zero-emission auto market in B.C.

B.C. getting its first hydrogen filling stations in Victoria, Metro Vancouver

Hydrogen fuel cells have powered transit buses, forklifts and other industrial vehicles for years, and they are now emerging as an alternative to conventional hybrid and plug-in electric vehicles for city drivers.

There are about 3,000 hydrogen-fuelled passenger vehicles on the road, mostly in Japan, California, Germany and France. And B.C. intends to lead the way for Canada, as it has done with electric cars.

Energy Minister Michelle Mungall hosted a demonstration of electric and fuel-cell vehicles at the B.C. legislature this week. Mungall announced that in addition to more electric charging stations, the province will start a hydrogen fuel network this year with two public retail stations in Metro Vancouver and one in Greater Victoria.

There were two hydrogen vehicles on display, a Toyota Mirai sedan that has been on the market for a couple of years, and a prototype Hyundai Nexo sport utility that I took for a spin along the Victoria waterfront.

Smooth and silent as a conventional electric, the Nexo accelerates rapidly and offers high-tech features like retracting door handles and a power display that illustrates the operation of the hydrogen fuel cell stack.

A pressurized hydrogen fuel tank at the back feeds the fuel cell, producing electricity without combustion. The only exhaust is water vapour, as the hydrogen is re-combined with oxygen to re-create the water it was extracted from.

Faizan Agha, manager of advanced product development for Hyundai Canada, says fuel cell vehicles have two key advantages over plug-in electric. They fuel as quickly as a gasoline vehicle, and their range is more than 600 km, three times that of an electric car that takes 16 hours or more to charge from a standard home plug-in.

Currently, hydrogen vehicles are more expensive to build than mass-market gasoline and diesel cars, but less expensive than battery-powered cars. With the range and portability of fuel, they may be better suited for rural and remote locations, where larger stationary fuel cells are used as clean energy generators in areas off the power grid.

Mungall said the B.C. government is continuing to develop its network of electric vehicle charging stations, doubling the number of fast-charging stations to 64 sites.

The province leads Canada in electric vehicle adoption, thanks in part to point-of-sale rebates of up to $5,000 for the purchase or lease of a new battery electric or plug-in hybrid, and up to $6,000 for a hydrogen fuel cell vehicle.

The B.C. Scrap-it program offers up to an additional $6,000 rebate for taking an old vehicle off the road and replacing it with an electric or fuel cell car.

Just Posted

Police chase ends in two arrests

Suspects in stolen truck evade RCMP from Alberta border to Clearwater area

Barriere family airlifted to Vancouver due to carbon monoxide exposure have now returned home

A family of five from Barriere was transported to Vancouver for medical… Continue reading

TNRD renews Dangerous Dogs Contract for area

Highlights from the Thompson-Nicola Regional District (TNRD) Board of Directors’ meeting of Nov. 22

Milobar wants to see details of NDP’s Clean BC Plan

Jessica Wallace Kamloops This Week Environment advocates call for action from Prime… Continue reading

Sundhu new president of Kamloops-Thompson-Cariboo New Democrats

Candidate in 2015 will steer the riding association as another candidate is chosen for 2019 federal election campaign

REPLAY: B.C’s best video this week

In case you missed it, here’s a look at the replay-worth highlights from this week across the province

Canucks score 3 power-play goals in 4-2 win over Oilers

Vancouver sniper Boeser has 6 goals in last 5 games

Microscopic parasite found in Prince Rupert water affecting thousands

More than 12,000 residents affected by the boil water advisory issued Dec. 14

Trudeau lashes out at Conservatives over migration “misinformation”

Warning against the “dangers of populism,” Trudeau says using immigration as a wedge political issue puts Canada’s future at risk.

B.C. hockey coach creates ‘gear library’ to remove cost barrier of sport

Todd Hickling gathered donations and used gear to remove the cost barrier for kids to play hockey.

Canada’s ambassador meets with second detainee in China

Global Affairs says John McCallum, Canada’s ambassador to China, met with Spavor Sunday

‘They’re coming:’ Flying cars may appear in urban skies by 2023

Air taxis will number 15,000 and become a global market worth $32 billion by 2035

B.C. VIEWS: Andrew Wilkinson on taxes, ICBC and union changes

Opposition leader sees unpredictable year ahead in 2019

5 tips for self-care, mental wellness this holiday season

Ministry of Mental Health and Addictions urging British Columbians to prioritize self care through festive season

Most Read