Canadian Cancer Society asks Barriere and area residents to unite in April for Daffodil Month

The daffodil pin will be available by donation at various businesses in Barriere throughout April

Barriere, B.C. – For the Canadian Cancer Society, the daffodil is more than a simple flower.

This bright and hopeful symbol shows people living with cancer that they don’t have to face cancer alone, and that we won’t give up until we have achieved our vision of a world where no Canadian fears cancer.

During April – Daffodil Month – the Canadian Cancer Society asks all Canadians to buy a daffodil pin and wear it to show their support for those living with cancer.

“We celebrate the ‘power of the flower’ all year round – but April is really our time to shine!” says Lynnette Wray, Financial Support Program Team Lead for the Canadian Cancer Society in the Southern Interior Region. “When loved ones are diagnosed with cancer, we often want to do something to help or honour them. This April, we want people to know that there is something they can do.”

Barriere residents can support Canadians living with cancer by wearing a pin, buying fresh cut flowers and donating to the door-to-door campaign. Every donation made during the Canadian Cancer Society’s April Daffodil Campaign brings us one step closer to preventing cancer, detecting it earlier, improving treatment and helping Canadians live longer, healthier lives.

Last year, thanks to everybody’s generous support of Daffodil Month, the Canadian Cancer Society was able to fund $45 million dollars in world-class research to fight all cancers and help more than 85,000 Canadians through its information and support services. The Society also funds important cancer prevention work so fewer Canadians are diagnosed in the first place.

“In April we like to focus on the support programs that help people on a cancer journey,” says Wray. “Like our Lodge in Kelowna where patients can stay during cancer treatments to the financial support program that helps pay for their travel expenses to get there.”

Of the five different regions in the BC/Yukon Division of the Canadian Cancer Society, the Southern Interior Region is the largest user of the financial support program. Since September 2010, over 1,500 clients have been approved for a total of over $700,000 in funding.

“Our region is the biggest user of the financial support program for several reasons,” explains Wray. “We’re very geographically dispersed and patients often have to travel long distances for cancer treatment in Kelowna or Vancouver. For example, a patient in Cranbrook might need specialized treatment that they can only get in Vancouver. That’s 958 kilometres with limited low-cost transportation options and barriers such as mountain passes and winter weather.”

“I’m proud to be a part of the Canadian Cancer Society because I think with the help of our amazing volunteers and generous donors we’re making a real difference in the lives of people on their cancer journey,” says Wray.

In Barriere, the Canadian Cancer Society kicks off Daffodil Month by selling fresh cut daffodils on March 27 at AG Foods and Interior Savings. Volunteers will also be out in the community during April, canvassing door-to-door and at their workplaces.

The daffodil pin will be available by donation at various businesses in Barriere throughout April, including Subway, Jim’s Food Market and BC Liquor stores.

“We’re looking forward to another successful Daffodil Campaign!” says Wray. “I want to thank everybody that buys a pin, or a bunch of daffodils, or donates to one of our volunteers at the door. Thank you for making a difference in the lives of cancer patients and their families.”

The Canadian Cancer Society is a national, community-based organization of volunteers whose mission is to eradicate cancer and enhance the quality of life of people living with cancer. Thanks to donors and volunteers, the Society has the most impact, against the most cancers, in the most communities in Canada. Building on their progress, they are working with Canadians to change cancer forever.

While cancer takes a huge toll on Canadians it’s important to remember that progress has been made against this disease. In the 1940s, the survival rate was 25 per cent.

Today, over 60 per cent of Canadians diagnosed with cancer will survive at least five years after their diagnosis, thanks in large part to Society-funded cancer research. And the survival rates for some cancers are much higher — with childhood cancer at 83 per cent, breast at 88 per cent and prostate at 96 per cent.

Check out the website at:  cancer.ca/daffodil

Twitter: @cancersociety

Facebook: CanadianCancerSociety

 

 

Just Posted

A Heffley Creek peacock caught not one - but two - lifts on a logging truck this month. (Photo submitted)
Heffley Creek-area peacock hops logging trucks in search of love

Peacock hitched two lifts in the past month

A tent housing a mobile vaccination clinic. (Interior Health/Contributed)
Second dose vaccinations accelerating throughout region: Interior Health

To date, more than 675,000 doses have been administered throughout the region

Okanagan Lake (File photo)
Thompson-Okanagan ready to welcome back tourists

The Thompson-Okanagan Tourism Association expects this summer to be a busy one

..
Four Paws Food Bank-Barriere helps area pet owners

Leia Kett (as in Star War’s Princess Leia) has been a Barriere… Continue reading

Barriere resident Donna Genier was happy to be able to gather with a small group of family and close friends to play a game of scrub last Sunday at the Barriere ball fields in memory of her youngest son Kurt Genier. Kurt passed unexpectedly in 2014 Since then, starting in 2015 an annual Memorial Slow Pitch Baseball Tournament has been held in Barriere to remember the young man who loved to play baseball. Unfortunately, the tourney had to be cancelled in 2020 and 2021 due to the pandemic. (Elli Kohnert photo)
Kurt Genier remembered with ball game in Barriere

The annual Kurt Genier Memorial Slow Pitch Ball Tournament was not able… Continue reading

People line up to get their COVID-19 vaccine at a vaccination centre, Thursday, June 10, 2021 in Montreal. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz
Vaccines, low COVID case counts increase Father’s Day hope, but risk is still there

Expert says people will have to do their own risk calculus before popping in on Papa

Thousands of protesters make their way through the downtown core during a Black Lives Matter protest in Ottawa, Friday June 5, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
MPs’ study of systemic racism in policing concludes RCMP needs new model

Chair of the House public safety committee says it’s time for a reckoning on ‘quasi-military’ structure

A case filled with packages of boneless chicken breasts is shown in a grocery store Sunday, May 10, 2020, in southeast Denver. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-David Zalubowski
One million chickens euthanized during labour dispute at Quebec slaughterhouse

Premier says waste amounts to 13 per cent of the province’s chicken production thrown in the garbage

Premier of Manitoba Brian Pallister speaks at a news conference at the Manitoba Legislative Building in Winnipeg on Wednesday, April 7, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/David Lipnowski
Provincial leaders want more federal money for health care, plan to meet in fall

Premiers ask Ottawa to increase its share of overall health spending to 35 per cent from 22 per cent

A section of the eastern slopes of the Canadian Rockies is seen west of Cochrane, Alta., Thursday, June 17, 2021. A joint federal-provincial review has denied an application for an open-pit coal mine in Alberta’s Rocky Mountains, saying its impacts on the environment and Indigenous rights aren’t worth the economic benefits it would bring. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
Panel says Grassy Mountain coal mine in Alberta Rockies not in public interest

Public hearings on the project in southern Alberta’s Crowsnest Pass region were held last fall

An old growth cedar stands in a cut-block within the Caycuse Valley. More than 100 prominent Canadians, have signed an open letter calling for the immediate protection of all remaining old-growth forests in B.C. (Submitted)
Brian Mulroney and Greta Thunberg among 100 celebrities pushing to save B.C. old growth

List includes Indigenous leaders, scientists, authors, Oscar winners

The border crossing into the United States is seen during the COVID-19 pandemic in Lacolle, Que. on Friday, February 12, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson
U.S. border restrictions to remain in place until at least July 21

Safety minister says Canada, U.S. extending restrictions on non-essential international travel

Himalayan Life helped finance the construction of Nepal’s Yangri Academic Centre and dormitories after a 2015 earthquake devastated the valley, killing more than 9,000 people. (Screen grab/Peter Schaeublin)
B.C. charity founder pledges to rebuild Nepalese school swept away by flash floods

Six years after an earthquake killed more than 9,000 people, Nepal faces another catastrophy

Most Read