Garden Club makes a number of changes

Several important decisions were made at the Nov. 21, North Thompson Valley Garden Club meeting.  Membership dues, which are due in January at the AGM, must be received no later than March 31, 2011.  Any dues not received at that time will result in the individual being taken off the membership and contact list.

Facilitator Shirley Wells shows one of the many ornamental grasses that she had on display during a lecture on the subject at the Nov. 21

Several important decisions were made at the Nov. 21, North Thompson Valley Garden Club meeting.  Membership dues, which are due in January at the AGM, must be received no later than March 31, 2011.  Any dues not received at that time will result in the individual being taken off the membership and contact list.

It was decided to put a permanent roof over the gazebo in the Barriere Community Garden; it will match the colour of the existing shed roof.

It was decided a damage deposit will be added to the cost of obtaining a plot in the community garden.  This deposit will be returned to the plot holder in the fall once their plot has been properly cleared.  The community garden sub-committee will be going over the plot-holder contract to make sure this is added.

The Garden Club will meet 10 times a year from now on, the third Sunday of every month except July and August.

Dates have been set for the annual Plant Sale – May 7, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.; and for the Harvest Festival – Sept. 11, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

After the meeting, Shirley Wells of Laughing Swan Farm spoke to the members about ornamental grasses.  She explained that there can be many reasons to plant ornamental grasses, such as;

• The aesthetic value – they can add grace and elegance to a garden

• They can be used as hedges or screens

• To protect other more tender plants

• Many grasses are evergreen and will add colour to the garden year round

• As a backdrop for perennials

• They can also be dried and used in flower arrangements

Wells also explained about where and how to plant the grasses.  

“Most grasses are not fussy about the type of soil they are planted in,” she stated, “But they do not like to be fertilized, and only tolerate minimal amounts of mulch.”

Some grasses are cool season grasses and like to be planted when the soil temperature is between 10°C and 18° C, and the air temperature is between 16° and 24° Celsius.  Ward season grasses prefer the soil temperature to be between 21° and 32° Celsius, and the air temperature between 26° and 35° Celsius.

Shirley Wells favourite saying is, “I’m dirty, therefore I’m happy!”

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