Learning the ways of presenting a Connections Circle for children in Barriere area

The Connections Circle promotes learning of identity, culture and language

Facilitator Brenda Griffiths holds the ‘Talking Stick’ as she instructs those participating in the Connection Circle training session.

Facilitator Brenda Griffiths holds the ‘Talking Stick’ as she instructs those participating in the Connection Circle training session.

An Aboriginal Engagement Connections Circle Training took place at the Barriere Ridge on May 28.  A number of ladies attended who work with young children and youth within area communities.  The half-day training was facilitated by Brenda Griffiths who led the participants through a number of exercises used in the circle, which include Granny and Grampa puppets, stuffed animals, drums, rattles, a Talking Stick, and more.

The Connections Circle promotes learning of identity, culture and language; all critical aspects in raising healthy children. The Circle supports and promotes the importance of traditional ways of early learning, through play, songs, stories, and the healthy development and wellbeing of all children, their families and their communities. The emphasis is on the important roles of grandparents and elders as teachers, mentors and knowledge-holders of how to care for and teach children.

The Connections Circle participates at numerous community events such as the recent Wellness Fair at Barriere Elementary, Barriere Baby’s of 2014 Luncheon,  as well as special appearances at the library, Rural Living Expo and other events.