Provincial biologists capture one of three remaining mountain caribou in a South Selkirk herd, to relocate it with a larger group in an effort to maintain a viable breeding population, January 2019. (B.C. forests ministry)

Provincial biologists capture one of three remaining mountain caribou in a South Selkirk herd, to relocate it with a larger group in an effort to maintain a viable breeding population, January 2019. (B.C. forests ministry)

We’ve upset the balance of nature

To the Editor,

I can’t believe the so-called experts, like politicians and fish and game people in our province, would think that killing cow moose and their calves is going to save the caribou. I have lived in the North Peace for many years and have seen the drastic decline in moose population.

Most of the problem is “Blood Ticks,” which thrive on moose. They leave big blood blisters on the moose and they rub on the trees to get rid of them, losing their hair and die a slow, agonizing death by freezing. I think the warmer winters is the biggest cause of the “Blood Ticks” thriving.

Now, another story about the decline in caribou. I’ve travelled the Alaska Highway for years from Fort St. John to Fort Nelson. The caribou were a problem because they would be on the highway to lick salt. Then they all but disappeared. So what happened to them?

There was no hunting season on them, and not much activity in the bush. So do the math.

I have a picture of 25 wolves in a line coming down an open hillside. How much meat do you think it takes to feed a pack like that?

Caribous are the dubmest aniumal I have ever hunted, but still very sensitive to oil, gas and logging activity.

I am not a rocket scientist, but it doens’t take much to think that killing more moose is going to save the caribou.

I’m not saying kill at the wolves. Before man came along, nature would balance itself. But, we have upset the balance of nature, so we have to try to control it, by keeping the wolves in check.

So killing more moost to save the caribou is sure as heck not the answer.

A retired hunter,

Lloyd Smith

Clearwater, B.C.