Aboriginal Engagement visits the Library Connection

Barriere Library was a special place for youngsters, thanks to a visit from the Aboriginal Engagement Success By Six

Cheryl Thomas tells a story through the actions of the Grampa puppet about a frog that goes “ribbit”

Cheryl Thomas tells a story through the actions of the Grampa puppet about a frog that goes “ribbit”

On Aug. 21, the Barriere Library was a special place for youngsters, thanks to a visit from the Aboriginal Engagement Success By Six.  On hand to bring fun and interactive learning to the kids were Cindy Wilgosh, Aboriginal Coordinator for the North Thompson Valley  and Success By Six helper Cheryl Thomas.

They brought with them the Granny and Grampa Connection Box, which is an interactive resource that includes cultural items such as a drum, rattle, a Metis sash, and stuffed animals.  Granny and Grampa are interchangeable puppets designed to engage parents and families in exploring their own cultural teachings and identities as First Nations, Inuit, and Metis people.

The connections box is rooted in the values, beliefs, and strengths that are important to pass on to our children – it recognizes and honours the diversity of children, families, and communities living in British Columbia.

The connection circle is to support and promote the importance of traditional ways of early learning, through play, songs, stories, dance, and the healthy development and well-being of all Aboriginal children, their families and their communities.  These circles will illustrate how learning our identities, culture and language are critical aspects in raising healthy children.

The emphasis is on the important roles of grandparents and elders as teachers, mentors and knowledge-holders of how to care for and teach our children.

The kids had a wonderful time, and especially enjoyed being able to use the many different sizes of drums presented for them to try out.