Shooting infrared on a colourful October day

Making Pictures With Professional Photographer John Enman

Photographing Chase falls with infrared and a fisheye lense produced an interesting picture.

Photographing Chase falls with infrared and a fisheye lense produced an interesting picture.

Fall snuck up on me this year. I guess I wasn’t paying attention.  Maybe that sharp and very quick transition from season to season will become the norm.

I had an appointment in Chase that meant a drive down and along the river valley to the village of Chase.  As I walked out the door not thinking about anything but the normal 20 minute drive that would probably turn into 30+ minutes if I got caught in the extensive road construction going on between my home in Pritchard and my appointment in Chase.

Linda called “take your camera”.

Oh, right. Taking my camera is always a good idea.

As I drove along looking at the changing colours I thought about the constant submissions of fall pictures I have been seeing on the local photographer’s facebook group.  However, I had `decided I would have more fun being different and instead chose my infrared converted camera and added a 10.5mm fisheye lens that had just come into my shop.

I pulled onto the Trans Canada, and turned into Chase 20 minutes later. The traffic was fast and I had driven through the construction without a stop.

I made my appointment in plenty of time, but the receptionist informed me they had decided to close early and I would have to come back another time.

In frustration I walked back to my car, but fortunately I had my camera. So instead of returning home I decided to wander around Chase.

The fisheye lense was fun. I could take pictures of people on the sidewalk without pointing the camera at them.

Admittedly the pictures were pretty weird with everything on the edges bending inward, and I got bored with the town’s limitations.

Fortunately Chase has a neat waterfall on one side and a big lake on the other. I left downtown and began with Chase Falls.

I photograph Chase Falls quite often, but this was the first time I was shooting in infrared and the first time I used a fisheye.

One can set up a tripod and capture the wonderful October colours that surround that inviting waterfall anytime, but capturing Chase Falls in infrared and with a fisheye is great fun, and a long ways off from what most photographers would every think of doing.

After an interesting time manipulating that environment I headed over to the lake for a complete change of scenery.

Instead of large rocks, overhanging trees and falling water, there is a long pier jutting out into Shuswap Lake, large trees on the edges of a small park, and a wide sandy beach.

Infrared turned the trees to white, the sky a strange shade of blue and everything else a slight magenta. And what about the fisheye lens?

Well, the fisheye lens just added to the already unreal quality of the image.

These are my thoughts for this week. Contact me at emcam@telus.net. Stop by Enman’s Camera at 423 Tranquille Road in Kamloops. I sell an interesting selection of used photographic equipment.

Call me at 250-371-3069.