100 Mile timber supply cut level unchanged

allowable annual cut for the 100 Mile House timber supply area (TSA) remains at 2.0 million cubic metres

Office of the Chief Forester

VICTORIA – The allowable annual cut for the 100 Mile House timber supply area (TSA) remains at 2.0 million cubic metres.

After five years, the allowable annual cut will decrease to 1.0 million cubic metres for an additional five years. In her decision, deputy chief forester Diane Nicholls specified that no more than 0.5 million cubic metres of the allowable annual cut can be harvested from live trees.

Mountain pine beetle populations have peaked in the 100 Mile House TSA and the infestation is now collapsing. However, a large volume of dead pine is still available for salvage over the next five years. The deputy chief forester indicated that by limiting the harvest of live trees, it is possible to maintain the allowable annual cut at 2.0 million cubic metres for five years. In addition to continued salvage, this decision also provides for other forest values, like wildlife habitat, riparian areas and old growth.

After five years, when the dead pine has deteriorated to the point that it can no longer be used for commercial purposes, the allowable annual cut will decrease to 1.0 million cubic metres.

This decrease reflects the need to transition to a lower mid-term timber supply that will occur until regenerating pine stands become suitable for harvesting. Limiting the harvest of live trees helps to mitigate the projected decrease.

The 100 Mile House TSA covers about 1.24 million hectares in south central British Columbia. It is bounded on the west by the Fraser River, on the east by the Cariboo Mountains, Wells Gray Provincial Park and Tree Farm Licence 18, on the north by the Williams Lake TSA, and on the east and south by the Kamloops TSA.

The 100 Mile House TSA includes several protected areas and parks. After excluding areas due to environmental, economic and operability issues, 670,372 hectares are available for harvesting.