This yearling, now re-located up north, was spotted up a tree in Trail two weeks ago. This was one of many sightings called into BC Conservation the last week of January. (Submitted photo)

B.C. cub that woke early from hibernation taken to sanctuary

Yearling was taken to Northern Lights Wildlife Society in northern B.C.

There’s a fairy-tale ending to the story about the little bear that woke up in the middle of wintertime in Trail.

After numerous sightings were called into the BC Conservation Service the last week of January, the cub was tranquilized by a conservation officer on Feb. 2 in East Trail. The yearling was then safely transported to a wildlife sanctuary in Smithers, and he is reported to be doing well.

So his life will hopefully be a long and healthy one in the surroundings where a bear belongs – in the wild and away from urban life.

“We are happy to say that yesterday morning the yearling cub from Trail arrived safe and sound,” Northern Lights Wildlife Society announced Feb. 4. “All in all (he) looks healthy and right now we are just giving him time to settle in and get over the capture and transport.”

Conservation Officer Ben Beetlestone says the decision to tranquilize the young male, and re-locate him up north, was made in consultation with a provincial veterinarian.

READ MORE: Young bear awakens early in Trail

ALSO WATCH: Trail cub caught on camera

“It was decided that it was the best thing to do in this situation,” Beetlestone told the Trail Times, mentioning the little bear was in good shape when captured.

“Just knowing that if the bear did go back into hibernation, he was probably going to wake up early and be accustomed to people already,” explained Beetlestone.

“And it would probably end up getting into trouble because he was already starting to get into potentially non-natural food sources. So based on all that, for the health and wellness of the bear, the decision was made by our provincial vet.”

Northern Lights Wildlife Society provides young injured and/or orphaned wildlife with a safe and healthy environment to mature into adulthood, upon which they are released back to the wild.

“As always it took a group of people with a heart for wildlife to save the bear in need, as with no natural feed available he would have starved to death,” the society said.

“Huge thanks to the Conservation Officers for capturing and approving (him) for rehab as well.”

Once the bear was tranquilized, and crated in the Castlegar conservation office for one night (Beetlestone said they keep a Northern Lights crate on hand) volunteers first drove it to Kelowna, then to Kamloops, and finally to Smithers.

“Now add to that winter driving conditions and you can see the commitment people are making to save a life,” the society said of the 16-hour trip from Trail to Smithers.

“Thank you also to all the others that offered to drive and those that have now signed up to be volunteer drivers in the future. If we all give a little, great things happen, together we make the impossible, a reality.”



newsroom@trailtimes.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

bearsLocal NewsNorthern Lights Wildlife ShelterWildlife

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

COVID-19 highlights lack of connectivity in First Nations communities

Many don’t have access required to utilize online platforms, says First Nations Technology Council

BC SPCA team helps discover new feline virus after outbreak at Quesnel shelter

Fechavirus is a kind of parvovirus, which makes cats and kittens very sick

Barriere RCMP hit the trail with BC Conservation Officer Service

Barriere RCMP Detachment Commander, Cpl. Robert Welsman, says he took to back… Continue reading

Plant veggies and enter Barriere Blooms contest

Victory Garden theme gets residents in the dirt

RV habitation once again a discussion topic for TNRD

“I don’t imagine for a moment that we’ve heard the last of the RV issue”

VIDEO: A Vancouver Island black bear takes weekend nap in eagle tree

Videos captured by Terry Eissfeldt shows the bear arriving Saturday night and sleeping in on Sunday

George Floyd asphyxiated by sustained pressure: family autopsy

Death sparked a wave of protests across the U.S. and abroad

COVID-19: B.C. commercial landlords can’t evict if they decline rent assistance

Emergency order ‘incentive’ for federal program, Carole James says

Investigators probe death of CN employee at Surrey rail yard

Transportation Safety Board is investigating an ‘occurrence that took place during switching operations’

Trans Mountain starts B.C. leg of pipeline twinning project

Mostly finished in Alberta, Burnaby terminal expanding

NDP getting COVID-19 wage subsidy ‘indirectly,’ B.C. Liberal leader says

Andrew Wilkinson says he’s heard no concerns from public

Love flourishes at Peace Arch Park, but COVID-19 concerns loom

South Surrey park becomes only place for international couples to meet

Most Read