Cat colony populations shown decline

BC SPCA community grants to reduce cat overpopulation is workings

Returning for its seventh year, the BC SPCA community animal spay neuter grant program is accepting applications for grant funding to address cat overpopulation in communities across B.C.

The program has seen demonstrable impacts in seven years, including decreased colony sizes, increased community partnerships and improved health for the cats currently in colonies.

In 2018, the program provided funding for grantees across the province, resulting in 830 fixed community cats and cats on First Nation lands, and 52 fixed dogs on First Nation lands – the biggest year for the program to date.

“It’s been exciting to see the results and hear the long-term impact from former grantees,” says Marieke van der Velden, BC SPCA outreach specialist. “Not only do the animals get the spay/neuter surgery but they also receive veterinary care that helps them have a better life.”

As part of the program requirements, free-roaming cats are assessed for sociability and any cats who could live in homes or barns end up being adopted out through rescues and sheltering agencies.

This year the program will continue to target and impact community cats across British Columbia. The program supports non-profit community organizations, veterinarians, First Nation communities and regional and municipal governments working to address pet overpopulation in their local areas.

Funding will be distributed to projects that better the welfare of a community’s most vulnerable companion animals and ensure there is a long-term impact. The application deadline is March 15, 2019. To learn more or apply for a grant, please visit spca.bc.ca/spayneutergrant.

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