Conservative Cathy McLeod re-elected as MP for Kamloops-Thompson-Cariboo

Conservative Cathy McLeod re-elected as MP for Kamloops-Thompson-Cariboo

Liberals finish election with the most seats but no majority

Conservative Cathy McLeod was convincingly re-elected as the MP for Kamloops-Thompson-Cariboo on Oct. 21.

“Obviously, [I’m] very pleased with the results and want to extend my appreciation to the voters of the riding who have trusted me again. It truly is always humbling and an honour. After five weeks, campaigns are lots of work so it’s kind of a tired happiness.”

McLeod took home 44.7 per cent of the vote with 32,057 votes out of a total of 71,703. Liberal Terry Lake came in second at 19,543 votes (27.3 per cent), a decrease from the 2015 election when the Liberals took 21,215 votes (30.41 per cent) and finished third.

McLeod calls the result significant in terms of the distance between herself and Lake.

“I think a lot of it speaks to concerns about natural resource development, forestry, pipelines and not feeling that the current government is on the right track in that area.”

Nationally, Justin Trudeau looks set to continue on as Prime Minister with the Liberals taking 157 seats (short of the 170 needed for a majority) followed by the Conservatives with 121 seats, the Bloc Quebecois at 32, the NDP at 24 and the Greens at three. Former Liberal Jody Wilson-Raybould was re-elected as an independent.

“The prime minister has been put on a short leash by the electorate. Clearly many people after 2015 expected that he’d have another majority mandate and he’s got a minority mandate and we have a very divided country. If you look at the map in terms of the Bloc Quebecois, the resurgence, the fact Saskatchewan [and] Alberta, there’s not a Liberal MP there. There’s some big challenges ahead for sure.”

Once Trudeau calls Parliament back, forestry needs to play a prominent role, says McLeod, as well as the Trans Mountain Pipeline.

Kamloops-Thompson-Cariboo NDP candidate Cynthia Egli finished in third with 9,824 votes (13.7 per cent), a low point for the NDP in the riding who’ve taken over 30 per cent of the vote since the 2006 federal election. That came after a tough start to the campaign for the NDP locally who had their first candidate withdraw for personal reasons and their second candidate withdrawn by the party over social media comments.

Egli called it a great day for New Democrats and a great day for Canadians.

“We made history – Jagmeet Singh is the first non-white leader of a federal party and he proved the so-called pundits wrong – he campaigned with courage, grace and intelligence. His positive message of inclusion and fairness resonated with voters and we have to be pleased with the outcome. We have a strong group of NDP’s in a minority parliament and an opportunity to help bring about important changes that will benefit families, workers, students, and Indigenous people.”

On a personal level, Egli says she’s pleased with her campaign – engaging with young people and ordinary folks feeling empowered because they had a real choice in this campaign.

“We started late and had a lot of ground to catch up. Our support continued to rise and I thank the voters for their support. It has been an honour to stand for election to parliament in Kamloops-Thompson-Cariboo.”

Despite a fourth-place finish, it was arguably a good night for Green Party candidate Iain Currie who finished with 8,696 votes (12.1 per cent), well over the 2,489 votes the party received in 2015 and their best result ever in the riding.

People’s Party candidate Ken Finlayson took home 1,123 votes (1.6 per cent), Animal Protection Party candidate Kira Cheeseborough 317 (0.4 per cent) and Communist Party candidate Peter Kerek 143 (0.2 per cent).

“Regardless of the outcomes, I am thrilled for having this opportunity to advocate and challenge injustice head-on. I want to thank all those who supported my campaign and volunteered their time,” said Cheesborough around 8 p.m.

Voter turnout in the riding was 69.8 per cent with 71,703 votes cast out of 102,759 registered electors (does not include electors who registered on election day). That was a step up from the national turnout which was 65.95 per cent.

McLeod ended on a positive note.

“I really appreciated the integrity with which they ran their campaigns. Certainly, there was great diversity and very respectful dialogue.”


newsroom@100milefreepress.net

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Residents line up outside the Vernon Recreation Complex for their COVID-19 vaccine Saturday, June 5. (Jennifer Smith - Morning Star)
No appointments necessary for first dose COVID-19 vaccine: Interior Health

People can just show up at clinics, register on the spot and get the shot

(TNRD Library)
Let the mystery of the Summer Reading Club begin

Are you ready to ‘Crack the Case’ at the Barriere Library?

(Metro Creative photo)
Gardeners of all ages invited to enter 2021 NT Fall Fair contests

The North Thompson Fall Fair Drive Thru scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 4,… Continue reading

Milsom Lodge was built in the East Barriere Valley when the Milsom brothers purchased two parcels of land in 1911, DL 2323 and DL2324. (Milsom’s photo)
The Milsom Lodge: The mansion, the ballroom, the history

“At the turn of the century, when so many families were leaving… Continue reading

teaser
Ladies Golf close enough for a cheery wave

A new month - new COVID rules - a new start. For… Continue reading

At an outdoor drive-in convocation ceremony, Mount Royal University bestows an honorary Doctor of Laws on Blackfoot Elder and residential school survivor Clarence Wolfleg in Calgary on Tuesday, June 8, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
‘You didn’t get the best of me’: Residential school survivor gets honorary doctorate

Clarence Wolfleg receives honorary doctorate from Mount Royal University, the highest honour the school gives out

“They will never be forgotten, every child matters,” says Sioux Valley Chief Jennifer Bone in a video statement June 1. (Screen grab)
104 ‘potential graves’ detected at site of former residential school in Manitoba

Sioux Valley Dakota Nation working to identify, repatriate students buried near former Brandon residential school

The Queen Victoria statue at the B.C. legislature was splattered with what looks like red paint on Friday. (Nicole Crescenzi/News Staff)
Queen Victoria statue at B.C. legislature vandalized Friday

Statue splattered with red paint by old growth forest proponents

Police cars are seen parked outside Vancouver Police Department headquarters on Saturday, January 9, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Vancouver police officer charged with assault during an arrest in 2019

The service has released no other details about the allegations

Denmark’s Christian Eriksen receives medical attention after collapsing during the Euro 2020 soccer championship group B match between Denmark and Finland at Parken stadium in Copenhagen, Saturday, June 12, 2021. (AP Photo/Martin Meissner, Pool)
Christian Eriksen in stable condition, Euro 2020 match resumes

Eriksen was given chest compressions after collapsing on the field during a European Championship

Members of the Department of Fisheries and Oceans’ Marine Mammal Response Program rescued an adult humpback what that was entangled in commercial fishing gear in the waters off of Entrance Island on Thursday, June 10. (Photo courtesy Marine Mammal Response Program)
Rescuers free humpback ‘anchored’ down by prawn traps off Vancouver Island

Department of Fisheries and Oceans responders spend hours untangling whale

As stories of the horrors of residential schools circulate after the Tk’emlups te Secwepemc First Nation announced it had located what are believed to be the remains of 215 children, Grand Chief Stewart Phillip of the Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs said he feels a connection with the former students. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
2 sides of the same coin: Ex-foster kids identify with residential school survivors

Grand Chief Stewart Phillip says the child welfare system takes Indigenous children from their families

Nathan Watts, a member of the Tseshaht First Nation near Port Alberni, shares his story of substance use, a perspective he said isn’t seen enough. (Photo courtesy of Nathan Watts)
Public shaming, hate perpetuates further substance use: UVic researcher

Longtime addict Nathan Watts offers a user’s perspective on substance use

Most Read