Doctor needs more time to study killer’s mind

Mark Lindsay appeared briefly in B.C. Supreme Court on Tuesday, Sept. 25

Mark Lindsay: Admitted killer claims to have acted out of fear of serial-killer group out to get him.

Mark Lindsay: Admitted killer claims to have acted out of fear of serial-killer group out to get him.

Kamloops This Week

The son of a former Edmonton police chief who admitted in a Kamloops courtroom last month to murdering his girlfriend in Alberta last year before committing two more violent attacks — one on an undercover cop and the other against a cellmate — will have to wait a few more weeks to learn his fate.

Mark Lindsay appeared briefly in B.C. Supreme Court on Tuesday, Sept. 25, for what was supposed to be a fix-date hearing at the conclusion of his 30-day in-custody psychiatric assessment.

Instead, court heard, the doctor writing the report on the 25-year-old’s mental health has asked for some more time.

“We just learned very recently that the report has not been completed,” said defence lawyer Don Campbell.

Lindsay stood trial in August on charges stemming from two separate incidents.

First, last September, he was charged with robbery, aggravated assault and possession of a weapon after an attack on an undercover RCMP officer in Barriere.

Lindsay was the target of an undercover Mr. Big sting — elaborate operations in which officers pose as gangsters in an attempt to gain the trust of an accused and eventually get a confession.

The sting was launched in response to the disappearance of Dana Turner, Lindsay’s former girlfriend, who was last seen in Edmonton hours after Lindsay finished serving a 50-day jail term for stabbing her in the head.

Lindsay admitted in court last month to stabbing the undercover Mountie and to killing Turner, but said both had been members of a group of “serial killers” who wanted him dead.

He also admitted to stabbing his cellmate, 21-year-old Michel Fougere, at Kamloops Regional Correctional Centre a month after his arrest following the Barriere incident.

Lindsay told court he believed Fougere also had ties to the serial killers.

At the conclusion of Lindsay’s trials, B.C. Supreme Court Justice Dev Dley ordered he undergo a 30-day psychiatric assessment to determine mental fitness.

Lindsay is due back in court on Oct. 19, at which time the report is expected to be complete.