Drinking water precautions and Boil Water Advisories during and after flooding

Interior Health advises residents that drinking water can be impacted during and after floods

North Thompson

Star/Journal

Interior Health is advising residents that drinking water can be impacted during and after floods. A current list of water advisories and notices is available at: www.drinkingwaterforeveryone.ca/. (Open in Google Chrome, Safari, or Firefox.)

Boil Water Notices were in place May 20, 2018, for the following water systems between Little Fort and Heffley Creek; Rivermount Motel BnB and RV Park, Lost Horse Motel Water System, Little Fort Community Hall Water System, Agate Bay Resorts Water System, Shuswap Highlands Water System Phase 2-3, McLure Firefighters & Rec Association WS, Pinegrove Campground Water System, Black Pines Community Water System, Haven Park Water System, Hitch ‘n Rail Resort Water System, Lakeview Water Users Community, Heffley Creek Waterworks, Tolko Industries Water – Heffley Creek, and Armour Ranch Water System.

WHAT DOES THIS NOTICE MEAN?

A boil water notice tells you that there are organisms in the water that can make you sick. To safely consume (swallow) the water, you must bring it to a rolling boil on a stove top for at least 60 seconds to kill these harmful organisms. Go to : www.drinkingwaterforeveryone.ca/ to learn more about water advisories

UNTREATED DRINKING WATER AT RISK OF CONTAINING PATHOGENS means: Drinking water has not been treated to prevent the risks posed by disease-producing organisms such as viruses and bacteria.

If you are unsure of the safety of your water or uncertain about how it is impacted, then you should use an alternate source that is not affected by floods, such as bottled water.

Individuals with compromised immune systems and chronic illnesses, infants, or the elderly are at higher risk when the drinking water is affected.

Floods may significantly increase risk to your health by introducing raw sewage, chemical contaminants, and debris into water sources.

It is important to remember the following when your drinking water is affected by floods:

· Do not drink or use any well water that has been contaminated with flood waters. Do not swallow water while you are showering or bathing. Your drinking water sources may need to be treated and tested before consumption can resume.

· For cleaning of your dishes, rinse them for a minute in diluted bleach (one tablespoon of household bleach per gallon of tap water). If you are using a dishwasher, use the hot wash and dry cycle.

· Many disease causing microbial agents, such as E. Coli may be present in water impacted by flooding. Wash your hands with soap after contact with flood waters or handling items that have come into contact with flood waters.

If you are using a Public Water Supply System

· Contact your supplier for information and pay attention to information shared by your local media such as community bulletins, newspapers, and local radio stations.

· You can also visit your Regional District website to see if your drinking water is impacted by the flood.

· Your water supplier may issue a Boil Water Notice or Do Not Consume advisory based on the health risks.

A current list of water advisories and notices is available at: www.drinkingwaterforeveryone.ca/. (Open in Google Chrome, Safari, or Firefox.)

If you are using a Private Water system

· Do not drink or use water that has been impacted by floods.

· Your drinking water source needs to be tested and may require treatment before consumption can resume.

· Even if you are not feeling sick, your water may be unsafe.

· Some contaminants found in impacted water cannot be seen, tasted or smelled, but can be harmful to your health.

For more flood information, please visit the Interior Health website or contact your nearest Environmental Public Health office.

Just Posted

B.C. turns up the heat

Environment Canada has issued a special weather statement for most the province due to high temperatures

MARS Wildlife Rescue offers some tips on keeping hummingbird feeders clean

Mould from dirty hummingbird feeders can be fatal

30 degrees and warmer forecasted with heat wave in B.C.

The weather could stay well into next week, according to Environment Canada

‘Daddy bonus’ common in B.C. workplaces, study finds

UBC researchers say dads don’t have to be number one in the office to get a raise

Northern Health Authority expands medical bus use

Over 60 or have mobility challenges? You can now travel on Northern Connections.

Canada won’t ‘play politics’ on U.S. migrant children policy

The U.S. government is under fire over its ”zero tolerance” policy

Independent schools continue to top Fraser Institute secondary school list

Think tank says its ratings are fair to all schools, public and private

Former Somali child refugee fights to stay in Canada

Former child refugee Abdoul Abdi’s judicial review set for today in Halifax

U.S. border separations ripple through midterm campaigns

Several Republicans to break from President Donald Trump amid boarder separation issues

AFN chief accused of being too close to Trudeau

Perry Bellegarde insists he is not that close to the Liberals as elections looms

Three injured after industrial explosion in Newfoundland

The roof of the warehouse was blown off in the explosion near St. John’s

Ottawa Senators trade Mike Hoffman, less than a week after allegations involving partner

Following the trade Senators make no mention of allegations against Hoffman’s partner

Late goal gives England 2-1 win over Tunisia

At the last World Cup in 2014, England couldn’t even win a game

Most Read