A light rail network in Surrey is one of the transit projects that could get money from a new billion-dollar-a-year federal Public Transit Fund.

A light rail network in Surrey is one of the transit projects that could get money from a new billion-dollar-a-year federal Public Transit Fund.

Federal budget rewards ‘rich’ seniors, funds transit

TFSA, RRIF changes help well-off retirees, while a $1-billion-year fund is earmarked for public transit

Seniors and savers are the big winners in the federal budget, while the Conservative government also pledged money for transit upgrades and a new maritime centre in Vancouver to shore up votes in B.C.

A new $1-billion-a-year Public Transit Fund was unveiled that along with other infrastructure funds could deliver the federal share of money for the Metro Vancouver mayors’ proposed transit expansion plan, including new rapid transit lines in Surrey and Vancouver.

Metro mayors say the new fund should ensure the more than $1.5 billion in federal contributions assumed under their plan will materialize, provided area voters pass a referendum to raise their share through a sales tax hike.

“The fact there is new federal money focused on transit is excellent for this region,” Port Coquitlam Mayor Greg Moore said. “However we have to make sure we can bring our regional portion to the table.”

RELATED:Federal budget costs Coast Guard, B.C. revenues

The big personal finance change in the budget is an increase in the annual contribution limit from $5,500 to $10,000 for Tax Free Savings Accounts (TFSAs) effective immediately.

TFSA contributions don’t generate a tax deduction but the interest, stock dividends and capital gains earned within them aren’t taxed and the money can be withdrawn at any time.

The higher limit will be useful to well-off seniors who must withdraw more than they need from retirement accounts. They and others will be able to gradually shield more money from tax within TFSAs rather than taxable investment accounts.

Critics say the change mainly benefits the wealthy and will threaten federal tax flows over time as more Canadian wealth is tax sheltered.

“This is so blatantly for the very rich,” said Lorraine Logan, president of the Council of Senior Citizens Organizations of B.C.

She said the budget will appeal to wealthy retirees but is silent on the concerns of lower-income seniors, from affordable housing to sustaining federal health transfers to the provinces.

A second key change will give more flexibility to retirees with Registered Retirement Income Funds. While RRSP contributions earn a tax deduction, seniors later pay tax on RRIF withdrawals and there’s a minimum withdrawal rates that rise each year after age 71.

The budget reduces those minimum withdrawals modestly, allowing seniors to keep more money tax shielded in RRIFs longer.

People caring for a terminally ill family member will now be able tap compassionate care benefits under Employment Insurance for six months instead of six weeks.

The Tories also pledged to cut the small business tax rate from 11 to nine per cent by 2019 on the first $500,000 earned.

The federal budget is balanced for the first time since 2008, with a $1.4-billion surplus that will go to pay down the debt.

Home builders applauded a targeted home renovation tax credit for seniors to help them make their homes more accessible. It rebates up to $1,500 out of $10,000 of spending on items like wheelchair ramps and walk-in bathtubs.

On the spending site, items for B.C. include $3 million to match provincial contributions to develop an International Maritime Centre in Vancouver to promote B.C. as a maritime centre and best-in-class transportation and logistics hub.

And $2 million is pledged to help the Pacific Salmon Foundation study survival problems of juvenile salmon and steelhead in the Salish Sea.

Part of the budget touts federal oil spill response preparedness but also commits to fund nearly $14 million in scientific research over five years on “the behaviour of oil in freshwater in order to contribute to the knowledge base to effectively respond to oil spills in some of the highest risk areas in Canada.”

Just Posted

Okanagan Lake (File photo)
Thompson-Okanagan ready to welcome back tourists

The Thompson-Okanagan Tourism Association expects this summer to be a busy one

teaser
Dynamic drives and pitiful putting helped even the score

Another Ladies’ Night has come and gone. This season is passing by… Continue reading

Tim Schewe
Drivesmart column: Traffic cop humour

He demands to know what sort of device had been used to measure his speed

(L-r) Cody Lee with six-year-old daughter Paisley, and Joshua Burleigh with his seven-year-old son Noah are extremely thankfull to Heffley Creek residents and First Responders for the help they received after their canoe capsized in rapids on the North Thompson River on Sunday, June 13. (Facebook photo)(L-r) Cody Lee with six-year-old daughter Paisley, and Joshua Burleigh with his seven-year-old son Noah are extremely thankfull to Heffley Creek residents and First Responders for the help they received after their canoe capsized in rapids on the North Thompson River on Sunday, June 13. (Facebook photo)
North Thompson River canoe trip almost ends in disaster

‘Only way I managed to get us to shore was the thought of not letting my boy drown’

A for sale sign is shown in by new homes in Beckwith, Ont., just outside Ottawa, on Wednesday, Jan. 11, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Thompson-Okanagan population grew despite COVID-19: report

The Chartered Professional Accountants of BC said there are 8,462 new residents in the region

Maxwell Johnson is seen in Bella Bella, B.C., in an undated photo. The Indigenous man from British Columbia has filed complaints with the B.C. Human Rights Tribunal and the Canadian Human Rights Commission after he and his granddaughter were handcuffed when they tried to open a bank account. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Heiltsuk Nation, Damien Gillis, *MANDATORY CREDIT*
VIDEO: Chiefs join human rights case of Indigenous man handcuffed by police in B.C. bank

Maxwell Johnson said he wants change, not just words, from Vancouver police

Tk’emlups te Secwepemc Chief Rosanne Casimir stands outside the former Kamloops Indian Residential School after speaking to reporters, in Kamloops, B.C., on Friday, June 4, 2021.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Kamloops chief says more unmarked graves will be found across Canada

Chief Rosanne Casimir told a virtual news conference the nation expects to release a report at the end of June

A woman wears a vaccinated sticker after receiving a COVID-19 vaccine at a vaccination clinic run by Vancouver Coastal Health, in Richmond, B.C., Saturday, April 10, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
B.C. ranks among highest in world in COVID-19 first-dose shots: health officials

More than 76% of eligible people have received their 1st shot

A screenshot of the First Peoples Cultural Councils First Peoples’ Map. (First Peoples Cultural Council)
Online resource blends B.C.-Alberta’s Indigenous languages, art and culture

Advisor says initiative supports the urgent need to preserve Indigenous languages

An artists conception of the new terminal building at the Pitt Meadows Regional Airport.
Air travel taking off in B.C., but lack of traffic controllers a sky-high concern

There will be demand for more air traffic controllers: Miller

Canadian Armed Forces experts are on their way to North Vancouver after a local homeowner expressed worry about a military artifact he recently purchased. (Twitter DNV Fire and Rescue)
Military called in to deal with antique ‘shell’ at North Vancouver home

‘The person somehow purchased a bombshell innocently believing it was an out-of-commission military artifact’

Phil McLachlan/(Black Press Media
Man shot at Kamloops shopping centre

The man is believed to be in stable condition

Amy Kobelt and Tony Cruz have set their wedding date for February, hoping that more COVID-19 restrictions will have lifted. (The Macleans)
B.C. couples ‘gambling’ on whether COVID rules will let them dance at their wedding

Amy Kobelt and Tony Cruz pushed back their wedding in hopes of being able to celebrate it without the constraints of COVID-19

Most Read