The mothers of three missing First Nations men from the Cowichan Valley want answers to their disappearances. Pictured, from left, is Phyllis Henry, mother of Ian Henry, Liz Louie, mother of Desmond Peter, and Myra Charlie, mother of Everett Jones. (Robert Barron/Citizen)

The mothers of three missing First Nations men from the Cowichan Valley want answers to their disappearances. Pictured, from left, is Phyllis Henry, mother of Ian Henry, Liz Louie, mother of Desmond Peter, and Myra Charlie, mother of Everett Jones. (Robert Barron/Citizen)

‘Fresh eyes’ looking into three missing Cowichan Tribes men

First Nations want answers to their disappearances

The mother of Desmond Peter, one of three missing First Nations men, wants answers to his disappearance 10 years ago.

Speaking at a meeting on Nov. 21 hosted by Cowichan Tribes to update the community on the ongoing efforts to find the men, Liz Louie tearfully said Desmond was just 14 years old when he disappeared and would be 24 now.

She said she has continued to search for him since he disappeared.

“The community needs to know these men are still missing, and more needs to be done to find them,” she said.

“It takes a community to raise a child, and it will take a community to help find these missing people as well.”

Desmond Peter was reported missing on March 12, 2007, from Duncan.

Two other First Nations men from the area went missing more recently.

Everett Jones, 47, was last seen leaving his home in the Club Road area in Duncan on the morning of Feb. 10, 2016, and Ian Henry, 26, has been missing since August, 2015, when he left his Tzouhalem Road-area home.

FOR RELATED STORY, CLICK HERE

Family and community members, as well as the RCMP, have been actively searching for the men since each of them disappeared.

RCMP Corp. Kerry Howse, head of First Nations policing for the North Cowichan/Duncan RCMP detachment, provided updates on each police file on the men at Tuesday’s community meeting.

He said Desmond Peter’s file has been sent to the B.C. Missing Persons Centre in Vancouver for a complete review to determine if local investigators might have overlooked something that could help break the case.

Howse said police have recently received some leads in Everett Jones’s disappearance that are being investigated, but provided no information as to what the tips are.

As for Ian Henry, Howse said the file has been sent to the RCMP’s Major Crime Unit in Victoria for review.

But he said that’s not because the RCMP have any indication that a major crime has taken place.

“Every missing person file has to be constantly reviewed, and this is just an opportunity for a fresh set of eyes to take a look at it, so the Major Crime Unit will review it and get back to us as to what, if anything, we can do further,” Howse said.

“We want the community to know that none of these three files are closed and are all being actively investigated.”

Patsy Jones, a member of Cowichan Tribes, is related to all three missing men and has been leading a small group of searchers in trying to locate them.

She said the group has searched through great swaths of the Cowichan Valley, including along all the local rivers, local logging roads, and around Mount Tzouhalem and the valley below it in efforts to locate any sign of the men.

Jones said requests have been made to take apart some of the log jams in the Cowichan and Somenos rivers in their hunt to find some clues to the men’s disappearances, but they may have to step back for awhile from the search as the weather worsens.

“Two years missing is too long for Ian and Everett, and 10 years missing is way too long for Desmond,” Jones said.

“We‘re beginning to feel at a loss and it’s hard to do more. Our family needs help with this.”

William Seymour, chief of Cowichan Tribes, said he hopes the meeting will spur a new push to finally end the mystery of the disappearance of the three men.

“These men have been missing for quite awhile, and every day it increases the heaviness on their families because they just don’t have any answers,” he said.

Anyone with information about any of the missing men should call the North Cowichan/Duncan RCMP at 250-748-5522.



robert.barron@cowichanvalleycitizen.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

teaser
Dynamic drives and pitiful putting helped even the score

Another Ladies’ Night has come and gone. This season is passing by… Continue reading

Tim Schewe
Drivesmart column: Traffic cop humour

He demands to know what sort of device had been used to measure his speed

(L-r) Cody Lee with six-year-old daughter Paisley, and Joshua Burleigh with his seven-year-old son Noah are extremely thankfull to Heffley Creek residents and First Responders for the help they received after their canoe capsized in rapids on the North Thompson River on Sunday, June 13. (Facebook photo)(L-r) Cody Lee with six-year-old daughter Paisley, and Joshua Burleigh with his seven-year-old son Noah are extremely thankfull to Heffley Creek residents and First Responders for the help they received after their canoe capsized in rapids on the North Thompson River on Sunday, June 13. (Facebook photo)
North Thompson River canoe trip almost ends in disaster

‘Only way I managed to get us to shore was the thought of not letting my boy drown’

A for sale sign is shown in by new homes in Beckwith, Ont., just outside Ottawa, on Wednesday, Jan. 11, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Thompson-Okanagan population grew despite COVID-19: report

The Chartered Professional Accountants of BC said there are 8,462 new residents in the region

People watch a car burn during a riot following game 7 of the NHL Stanley Cup final in downtown Vancouver, B.C., in this June 15, 2011 photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Geoff Howe
10 years ago: Where were you during the 2011 Vancouver Stanley Cup Riots?

Smashed-in storefronts, looting, garbage can fires and overturned cars some of the damage remembered today

(Black Press Media file)
Dirty money: Canadian currency the most germ-filled in the world, survey suggests

Canadian plastic currency was found to contain 209 bacterial cultures

(pixabay file shot)
B.C. ombudsperson labels youth confinement in jail ‘unsafe,’ calls for changes

Review states a maximum of 22 hours for youth, aged 12 from to 17, to be placed in solitary

Eleonore Alamillo-Laberge, 6, reads a book in Ottawa on Monday, June 12, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Parents will need to fight ‘COVID learning slump’ over summer: B.C. literacy experts

Parents who play an active role in educating their children this summer can reverse the slump by nearly 80%, says Janet Mort

Kelowna General Hospital. (File photo)
COVID-19 outbreak at Kelowna General Hospital declared over

Three people tested positive for the virus — two patients and one staff — one of whom died

The border crossing on Highway 11 in Abbotsford heading south (file)
Western premiers call for clarity, timelines on international travel, reopening rules

Trudeau has called Thursday meeting, premiers say they expect to leave that meeting with a plan

The B.C. government’s vaccine booking website is busy processing second-dose appointments, with more than 76 per cent of adults having received a first dose. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
B.C.’s COVID-19 infections, hospitalizations stable for Tuesday

108 new confirmed cases, 139 in hospital, 39 in intensive care

A worker, at left, tends to a customer at a cosmetics shop amid the COVID-19 pandemic Thursday, May 20, 2021, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
Half of cosmetics sold in Canada, U.S. contain toxic chemicals: study

Researchers found that 56% of foundations and eye products contain high levels of fluorine

Most Read