Invasive Japanese Knotweed takes root in the Thompson-Nicola Regional District

The Thompson-Nicola Invasive Plant Management Committee (TNIPMC) is asking the public to be on alert for invasive Japanese knotweed and report sightings in the Thompson-Nicola Regional District.

Public input will be used to help update the knotweed inventory for the region and will assist in the development of a strategy to support Japanese knotweed management throughout the TNRD. To report knotweed in the region and get more information, visit www.tnipmc.com, call 1-250-851-1699 or email invasiveplants@tnrd.ca.

Japanese knotweed are one of the 100 worst invasive species as identified by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). The invasive perennial plant is native to eastern Asia and was introduced to North America in the 1800’s as an ornamental plant. It’s widely spread throughout the coastal regions of BC and several infestations are known within the TNRD. Japanese knotweed is often mistaken for bamboo; however, it is easily distinguished by the zigzag pattern in which its broad leaves are arranged along the plant’s arching stems.

Japanese knotweed are often found growing next to homes and within ornamental gardens. Its highly aggressive root system can extend 20 m across and 3 m deep, and can penetrate septic beds, home foundations, retaining walls, asphalt and other critical structures.

This plant reproduces by seed and through root and shoot fragments (as small as 1cm). Manual removal such as digging and cutting plants is not recommended and could make the infestation worse. Contact a specialist prior to managing knotweed infestations to discuss a management and disposal plan. Learn more about Japanese knotweed and other invasive species at www.tnipmc.com.

Just Posted

Mike Wiegele kicks off 50th anniversary season

Submitted The first guests of Mike Wiegele Helicopter Skiing (MWHS)’s 50th anniversary… Continue reading

Plane crash survivor becomes inspiration for new book

Submitted In August of 1997, members of the Clearwater RCMP and ambulance… Continue reading

74% of 9-1-1 calls now come from cellphones – why knowing your location is key

With nearly three-quarters of 9-1-1 calls in B.C. originating from cellphones, E-Comm… Continue reading

Tips for wise giving during the holidays

The holiday giving season is the most generous time of year for… Continue reading

VIDEO: Success of wildlife corridors in Banff National Park has advocates wanting more

Demand for more highway protection escalated after seven elk were killed by a semi-trailer near Canmore

Fans sing Canadian anthem after sound system breaks at BMW IBSF World Cup

The Canadians in attendance made sure their team and flag were honoured on the podium

VIDEO: Fire destroys Big White Ski Resort chalet

Social media eulogies peg the property, nicknamed “The Pharamacy,” as both loved and hated

Prince George RCMP use bait packages to catch porch pirates over the holidays

First-in-Canada program with Amazon looks to combat parcel theft

Nanaimo mechanical engineer creates thief tracking program

Nanaimo Thief Tracking lets users plot and share information about thefts online

Mayor wants B.C. to institutionalize severely mental ill people who are homeless

Those suffering from mental health conditions, such as schizophrenia, need specialized care, mayor says

Five things of note from Trudeau’s mandate letters to his ministers

Some marching orders come from the Liberal Party’s campaign, while others are new additions

Scheer’s resignation tips party into internal war over school tuition payments

The Conservatives have a Toronto convention already scheduled for April

Most Read