Rural emergency course held at valley hospital

Clearwater’s Dr. Helmcken Memorial Hospital hosted a CARE course

A team of health-care staff from Clearwater rush to the aid of well-known local rodeo start Buck (Dr. John) Soles after he is thrown from his bull. The incident conveniently occurred in front of Dr. Helmcken Memorial Hospital during a two-day course on rural emergency procedures last weekend.

A team of health-care staff from Clearwater rush to the aid of well-known local rodeo start Buck (Dr. John) Soles after he is thrown from his bull. The incident conveniently occurred in front of Dr. Helmcken Memorial Hospital during a two-day course on rural emergency procedures last weekend.

Clearwater’s Dr. Helmcken Memorial Hospital looked a bit like a school last weekend – or maybe a disaster area.

The hospital was hosting a CARE course, with 24 staff (eight doctors, eight nurses and eight paramedics) from Clearwater, Barriere and Chase taking part.

“CARE stands for Comprehensive Approach to Rural Emergencies,” said Dr. John Soles.

The local physician is on the CARE course faculty and has travelled to several communities in the province to help present it.

Last weekend was the first time the course was presented in Clearwater.

“It recognizes that rural emergency medicine is different from that in the urban emergency room,” he said.

During the two long days of the course the participants spent about half their time in skill sessions in the classroom, and the other half dealing with 16 different emergency scenarios – scenarios based on real-life events and that involved unusual and high-level challenges.

Comprehensive rural emergency care is the focus, including airway management, trauma care, cardiac care, emergency obstetrics, paediatrics and neonatal care.

Objectives of the course include:

• early recognition of the critically ill patient;

• effective initial and definitive airway management;

• judicious and timely use of critical interventions and procedures;

• appropriate use of ongoing assessment, monitoring and investigations;

• practical preparation and facilitation of safe, timely transfer of patients;

• appropriate clinical judgement and decision-making;

• effective communication and teamwork in the multidisciplinary setting; and

 

• effective techniques for managing the challenges of emergency care in the rural setting.