Millions of sockeye make their way back to the gravel beds of the Adams River

Millions of sockeye make their way back to the gravel beds of the Adams River

Salute to the Sockeye brings on some changes

Adams River Salmon Society at Roderick Haig-Brown Park to kick off the Salute to the Sockeye Festival

There is a lot of buzz at Roderick Haig-Brown Park and no, it’s not bees. Excavators and saws working on a multi-year construction project have left many new facilities, and the first of thousands of families have descended on the park to view the spawning salmon.

On Sunday, MLAs Todd Stone and Greg Kyllo joined Jerry the Moose and the Adams River Salmon Society at Roderick Haig-Brown Park to kick off the Salute to the Sockeye Festival; a world-renowned event celebrating the dominant sockeye run in the Fraser River.

The $1.2 million dollar construction project allows for greater flexibility in Roderick Haig-Brown Park, and provides new facilities for large and small groups. A new, smaller day-use area meets the needs of families and individuals who come year-round to hike, mountain bike, snowshoe, ski and view wildlife. A new gathering space can adequately accommodate large festivals and community events.

The Pacific Salmon Foundation announced that the BC Conservation Foundation is the recipient of a Community Salmon Program grant worth $120,250 for work on its Swift Creek Watershed Restoration Project. The announcement was made in Kamloops on Oct. 4 with MP Cathy McLeod (Kamloops-Thompson-Cariboo) at a Pacific Salmon Foundation reception in conjunction with the “Salute to the Sockeye” celebration at the Adams River. Funding for the grant was generated in part through the proceeds from anglers obtaining Salmon Conservation Stamps through Fisheries and Oceans Canada.