University of Calgary researcher Dr. Jeff Dunn is interviewed about new technology developed by the university to detect and monitor concussions. (Jeff McIntosh/The Canadian Press)

Scientists use MRIs to curb use of rats, mice in medical research

Researchers use a small MRI to test possible treatments for cancer, strokes and multiple sclerosis

Medical scientists at the University of Calgary have taken steps to minimize the impact on mice and rats used in their experiments.

The university’s Cumming School of Medicine is outfitted with a small MRI that researchers use as they test possible treatments for cancer, strokes and multiple sclerosis.

“It’s one of the premier ones in Canada,” said Jeff Dunn, director of the school’s Experimental Imaging Centre.

“Anything under 500 grams fits in there, so mostly rats and mice. We use those in medical research obviously for preclinical assessment, how the disease progresses and possibly even more importantly if the treatment is functional.”

The MRI has been in use since 2004. The lab is also equipped with a blood gas analyzer, so tests can be done using blood samples taken from the animals in much the same way they are collected from human patients.

It’s a far cry from when scientists would use rats and mice and have to dissect them at every test stage.

“It really reduces the use of animals in research because, for a time-course study of treatment, we don’t have to do a whole bunch of animals,” Dunn said.

“You can take a small number and follow them over months to see how the treatment is working.”

READ MORE: Animal rights group appeals B.C. court decision over euthanized bear cub

Any research facility receiving government funding is subject to rules set out by the Canadian Council on Animal Care.

Spokeswoman Sandra MacInnis says the organization wants to ensure animal-based science in Canada takes place only when necessary and that the animals receive optimal care.

“For example, when selecting a research model, they must first consider all possible alternatives to animal models, such as computer or cell-culture models,” she wrote in an email.

The executive director of the Vancouver-based Animals in Science Policy Institute says efforts by the University of Calgary and others to use the equipment are a matter of debate.

Elisabeth Ormandy, a former researcher, said putting a mouse under an MRI scanner requires sedation or anesthesia and could be considered a source of distress for an animal since it could happen several times.

“It depends on our own personal ethics,” Ormandy said. “For people who care about that one individual mouse, that (MRI) might still not be OK.”

But she said some people might argue “it’s better to cause a little bit more suffering to one mouse instead of moderate suffering to 10 mice.”

An animal rights organization said there’s no need to use animals in tests at all when computer modelling can be just as useful.

“All things else being equal, certainly hurting and killing fewer animals is better than hurting and killing more animals,” said Jeremy Beckham, research associate with People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals.

But he said that loses the bigger question a little bit.

“There’s not any real basis to think they feel pain any less than, say, a dog or a cat,” Beckham said.

“We’ve bred dogs and cats to be our companions, so we’ve got a little bit more of an emotional attachment to them. But the ethical issues of using rats and mice are staring us in the face just as strongly.”

Bill Graveland, The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

District of Barriere corrects letter writer, says dogs must be leashed in Barriere Parks

To the editor; In today’s edition of the newspaper (May 23, 2019),… Continue reading

224 members attend 4-H Rally at Agriplex

Annual 4-H Rally at the North Thompson Agriplex welcomed both junior and… Continue reading

North Thompson Spartans win Zones

By Jill Hayward Congratulations to the North Thompson Spartans Senior 7s Rugby… Continue reading

Barriere Babies of 2018 Party happening June 7

If you live in the area and your baby was born in 2018, you’re invited

No public input received on proposed rezoning for McLure cannabis store

Board votes water meters to be installed in all TNRD Community Water Systems over the next couple of years

600 new campsites coming to provincial parks and recreation sites across B.C.

Tourism Minister announced half of the new spots to 13 most popular provincial parks

Raptors beat Bucks 105-99 to move within 1 game of NBA Finals

Leonard scores 35 as Toronto takes 3-2 series lead over Milwaukee

Municipalities protest after B.C. declares marijuana crops ‘farm use’

UBCM president seeks answers in letter to John Horgan government

CMHC defends mortgage stress test changes amid calls for loosening rules

Uninsured borrowers must now show they could service their mortgage if rates rose two per cent

Nisga’a Nation tourism industry hits the road

First pilot tour to the Nass Valley is set for this summer with Indigenous Tourism BC

B.C. woman left ‘black and blue’ after being pushed off 40-foot cliff at lake

West Shore RCMP looking for witnesses as investigation continues

Thunderstorms to bring heavy rain, risk of flash floods in the southern Interior

Ten to 30 millimetres of rain to fall over the early weekend

Unbe-leaf-able: Agassiz man finds more than 200 four-leaf clovers in a month

Walt Hardinge has found more than 219 four-or-more leaf clovers this spring alone

Crews fight fire with fire to keep blaze from northern Alberta town

The wildfire now covers some 920 square kilometres

Most Read