Darrell Baker is shown in this undated handout photo. Courtney Baker doesn’t know what she’s going to do with the urn she’s picked out for her little brother’s ashes. They were supposed to arrive by express post from Edmonton to Vancouver more than two weeks ago, but after the expected delivery date was pushed back several times, she’s come to the conclusion that they may be lost. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO, Courtney Baker *MANDATORY CREDIT*

Darrell Baker is shown in this undated handout photo. Courtney Baker doesn’t know what she’s going to do with the urn she’s picked out for her little brother’s ashes. They were supposed to arrive by express post from Edmonton to Vancouver more than two weeks ago, but after the expected delivery date was pushed back several times, she’s come to the conclusion that they may be lost. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO, Courtney Baker *MANDATORY CREDIT*

Sister in B.C. waits for little brother’s ashes that seem to be lost in transit

The ashes were supposed to arrive by Christmas Eve

Courtney Baker doesn’t know what she’s going to do with the urn she’s picked out for her little brother’s ashes.

They were supposed to arrive by express post from Edmonton to Vancouver more than two weeks ago, but after the expected delivery date was pushed back several times, she’s come to the conclusion that they may be lost.

Darrell Baker died Nov. 26 in Edmonton, said his sister who lives in Vancouver.

The 36-year-old’s remains were cremated at a funeral home in Edmonton and shipped via Canada Post to the family on Dec. 22.

The ashes were supposed to arrive by Christmas Eve, and at this point Courtney Baker said she’s checked the tracking number so many times she knows it by heart.

“We just want our brother to come home so we can lay him to rest,” she said.

The tracking number now shows the ashes are expected Jan. 12.

A spokesman for Canada Post said the organization will be in touch with Baker “as the item moves through our network.”

“We understand the importance of this item and have been investigating since being contacted by the customer,” Phil Legault said in an emailed statement. “The item was unfortunately mailed just days before Christmas when we were focused on clearing the backlogs caused by processing heavy volumes while maintaining COVID-19 safety protocols throughout our operations.”

Baker said the $110 urn — sky blue with a soaring eagle on it — is due to be delivered Monday.

“And what am I gonna do with it?” she asked. “We don’t have his ashes.”

She picked out the urn because eagles play a “significant” part in her brother’s Nlaka’pamux culture. He was from the Coldwater Band near Merritt, B.C., she said.

“When we see eagles, it’s a sign that your family members are watching over you.”

Baker said their mother, who has health problems, has taken her son’s death the hardest and had to be taken to the hospital.

“With his passing and not knowing where his remains are, it’s making her issue worse,” she said.

The family doesn’t know the cause of his death and is waiting on the autopsy report for answers.

Her brother moved to Alberta a few years ago and worked on oil rigs.

He became addicted to drugs about 12 years ago, but got clean and remained that way for the last decade, she said.

During that time the siblings had a falling out. Getting closure now is important for her, Baker said.

“He’s the baby of the family. You know, siblings are sort of supposed to look out for each other,” she said.

“I tried to give him helpful tips and advice,” she said. “He’s independent and likes to do his own thing. And I guess he doesn’t like receiving advice. We just lost contact.”

The older sister described her little brother as an animal lover, a kid who loved cars, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Tonka trucks and was always off on some adventure.

“He would rescue animals, find them homes, or take them in himself if he could from the time he was very young.”

The way she looks at it now, Baker said, is that her brother is away on “some adventure,” travelling like he always did.

“And when the time is right for me, I am looking at adopting a dog and naming him after Darrell or one of his middle names, which is Benjamin Clifford.”

ALSO READ: COVID-19 vaccine arrives in remote First Nations across Canada

Hina Alam, The Canadian Press


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Want to support local journalism during the pandemic? Make a donation here.

funeral

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

(Metro Creative photo)
Barriere Lions holding bottle drive to help out local Legion

The Barriere Lions Club are gearing up to collect bottles and cans… Continue reading

Mason scores a sweet goal during scrimmage practice at the Sportsplex on Saturday (Jan. 9) morning, with a little support from Eric. While engaged in the game of scrimmage, the pre-novice (under age 6) and novice (aged 7 & 8) players worked on their shots, aiming for the pylon in net. (Stephanie Hagenaars photo)
He shoots, he scores!

Mason scores a sweet goal during scrimmage practice at the Sportsplex on… Continue reading

Kamloops-Thompson-Cariboo MP Cathy McLeod is shown speaking virtually to District of Barriere mayor and council during their regular council meeting on Jan. 11.  (Jill Hayward photo)
Having confidence in Canada’s economic recovery plan is critical says McLeod

Kamloops-Thompson-Cariboo Member of Parliament Cathy McLeod, and Kamloops-North Thompson MLA Peter Milobar… Continue reading

Maj.-Gen. Dany Fortin, vice-president of logistics and operations at the Public Health Agency of Canada, speaks at a news conference on the COVID-19 pandemic in Ottawa, on Friday, Jan. 15, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang
B.C. records 500 new COVID-19 cases Wednesday, 14 deaths

Outbreak at Surrey Pretrial jail, two more in health care

(Pxhere)
B.C. nurse suspended after using Tensor bandage to trap long-term care patient in room

Susan Malloch voluntarily agreed to a three-day suspension of her certificate of registration

Abbotsford’s Skully White (left), who donated his kidney in December, has started a campaign to find other recipients and donors. The first candidate is retired police officer Gavin Quon. White owns and operates a hotdog stand, Lullys Food Experience, out of the Abbotsford Canadian Tire parking lot. (Facebook photo)
After donating his kidney, Abbotsford hotdog king starts donor campaign

Skully White donated his kidney to customer Tim Hiscock in December

Toronto-based director Michelle Latimer was recently scrutinized after years of claiming she was of Algonquin and Metis descent. (CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young)
Haida activist calls for hefty fines, jail time against those who claim to be Indigenous

Filmmaker Tamara Bell proposing the Indigenous Identity Act – to dissuade ‘Indigenous identity theft’

(File)
Man allegedly bites Vancouver cop during arrest for outstanding warrant

The officer was treated in hospital for the bite wounds

Black bear cubs Athena and Jordan look on from their enclosure at the North Island Wildlife Recovery Association in Errington, B.C., on July 8, 2015. Conservation Officer Bryce Casavant won the hearts of animal lovers when he opted not to shoot the baby bears in July after their mother was destroyed for repeatedly raiding homes near Port Hardy, B.C. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
Supreme Court quashes review of B.C. conservation officer who refused to euthanize bears

Bryce Casavant was dismissed from his job for choosing not to shoot the cubs in 2015

(File Photo)
Interior Health says COVID positivity rates in Fernie area actually 10-12%

IH say the rates are not as high as previously claimed by the region’s top doctor

Francina Mettes and Thomas Schouten with the 200-page document they submitted in December of 2018. (Travis Paterson/News Staff)
Dutch man, 94, facing unwanted trip home can stay in B.C. with wife of 45 years

Immigration offices cuts red tape so couple of 45 years can stay together in Victoria area

Most Read