A salmon farm near Tofino. (Black Press files)

A salmon farm near Tofino. (Black Press files)

B.C. VIEWS: Horgan fumbles salmon farm threat

Agriculture Minister Lana Popham falls for propaganda

The B.C. NDP’s transition from protest party to minority government is not going smoothly, and their ham-fisted threat to cancel salmon farm tenures north of Vancouver Island is the latest example.

As Premier John Horgan was leading a delegation to Alert Bay to meet with Indigenous leaders after a six-week occupation of two salmon farms, a letter went out to Marine Harvest, owner of those and other net-pen facilities that have operated in the remote region for 30 years.

Signed by Agriculture Minister Lana Popham and copied to Forests Minister Doug Donaldson and Indigenous Relations Minister Scott Fraser, the letter suggests Marine Harvest not restock one of its farms wth fish because it’s a “sensitive time in government-to-government discussions” with area Indigenous communities.

I’ve posted the letter online, but here’s the short version: Nice little business you’ve got there. Be a shame if anything happened to it.

One of B.C.’s multiple protest groups cheered the letter, calling it an “eviction notice” for the 18 salmon farms in the Broughton Archipelago whose tenures come up for renewal next June. Some of these operations are welcomed by local Indigenous communities, giving them something scarce in remote places – employment.

Marine Harvest’s Ian Roberts tells me the need to restock was clearly communicated to governments. Live salmon smolts, carefully raised in a hatchery, can’t simply be put on hold for politics.

He said the company is in detailed discussions with federal and provincial governments and is willing to relocate some farms to avoid Pacific salmon migration routes. But it won’t simply be shut down by protests like the ones organized by the Sea Shepherd Society for two straight summers.

Given that these are legally operating, federally licensed and inspected facilities, the RCMP sent a patrol boat to keep the peace while the farm in question was restocked.

When I questioned Popham and Horgan on this, both cited the recommendations of Justice Bruce Cohen’s 2012 report. That’s a $25 million federal inquiry into the long-term decline of sockeye salmon along the entire North Pacific coast from Washington to Alaska.

Neither Popham nor Horgan demonstrated a detailed understanding of the Cohen Commission’s findings. Their grasp of the issue seemed similar to most people who have seen a long parade of media reports featuring shock-photographer Alexandra Morton and celebrity activists.

Horgan said most people know B.C. salmon farming has been “controversial” for 30 years, and all you have to do is “a quick Google search.” It’s controversial all right, thanks to U.S.-funded de-marketing campaigns going back to 2004.

Oddly, nobody mentions Cohen’s finding of declining salmon runs in the Skeena, Nass and Klukshu River in Yukon, all far from salmon farms, or the effect of Alaska salmon “ranching” that floods the North Pacific with hatchery fish, later netted and marketed as “wild caught.”

The campaign continues, with activists posting pictures of injured or deformed salmon to attract support for online petitions. As any professional biologist can tell you, sick and deformed animals occur in every population, including humans. In wild fish they are quickly eaten, but in closed containment, some survive.

This ugly propaganda is apparently enough to fool not just the average urban B.C. resident, but members of our provincial cabinet as well.

• In my last column concerning environmental campaigns respecting salmon farms, I stated inaccurately that Tides Canada Foundation (TCF) supported Sea Shepherd Conservation Society and aboriginal occupation of Marine Harvest aquaculture. TCF assures me and I accept that TCF does not support either. I regret the error and apologize for any confusion.

Tom Fletcher is B.C. legislature reporter and columnist for Black Press. Email: tfletcher@blackpress.ca


@tomfletcherbc
tfletcher@blackpress.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

BC legislatureSalmon farming

Just Posted

Residents line up outside the Vernon Recreation Complex for their COVID-19 vaccine Saturday, June 5. (Jennifer Smith - Morning Star)
No appointments necessary for first dose COVID-19 vaccine: Interior Health

People can just show up at clinics, register on the spot and get the shot

(TNRD Library)
Let the mystery of the Summer Reading Club begin

Are you ready to ‘Crack the Case’ at the Barriere Library?

(Metro Creative photo)
Gardeners of all ages invited to enter 2021 NT Fall Fair contests

The North Thompson Fall Fair Drive Thru scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 4,… Continue reading

Milsom Lodge was built in the East Barriere Valley when the Milsom brothers purchased two parcels of land in 1911, DL 2323 and DL2324. (Milsom’s photo)
The Milsom Lodge: The mansion, the ballroom, the history

“At the turn of the century, when so many families were leaving… Continue reading

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau participates in a plenary session at the G7 Summit in Carbis Bay, England on Friday June 11, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Canada donating 13M surplus COVID-19 vaccine doses to poor countries

Trudeau says the government will pay for 87 million shots to be distributed to poor countries

Montreal Canadiens goaltender Carey Price (31) is scored on by Vegas Golden Knights defenseman Alec Martinez, not pictured, during the second period in Game 1 of an NHL hockey Stanley Cup semifinal playoff series Monday, June 14, 2021, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)
Habs fall 4-1 to Vegas Golden Knights in Game 1 of NHL semifinal series

Match was Montreal’s first game outside of Canada in 2021

Kelowna-Lake Country MLA Norm Letnick, assistant deputy speaker at the B.C. legislature, presides over committee discussions. The legislature is completing its delayed spring session this week, with most MLAs participating by video conference. (Hansard TV)
B.C.’s daily COVID-19 infections dip below 100 over weekend

Only 68 new cases recorded Monday, four additional deaths

The BC Ferries website went down for a short while Monday morning following a provincial announcement that recreational travel between health authorities can resume Tuesday. (Black Press Media file photo)
BC Ferries’ website crashes in wake of provincial reopening announcement

Website back up now, recreational travel between health regions to resume as of Tuesday

The Kamloops Indian Residential School is photographed using a drone in Kamloops, B.C., Monday, June, 14, 2021. The remains of 215 children were discovered buried near the former school earlier this month. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Communities grapple with what to do with former residential and day schools

Some tear them down as a tool to help healing, others repurpose them as tools for moving forward

FILE – Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry talks about B.C.’s plan to restart the province during a press conference at Legislature in Victoria, Tuesday, May 25, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
B.C. watching U.K.’s COVID struggles but don’t think province will see similar pitfalls

Studies show that one dose of vaccine is only 33 per cent effective in preventing B.1.617.2 spread

RCMP Const. Shelby Patton is shown in this undated handout photo. RCMP say that Patton was hit by an allegedly stolen truck that he had pulled over on Saturday morning in Wolseley, east of Regina. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO, RCMP
Pair charged in Saskatchewan Mountie’s death make first court appearance

Const. Shelby Patton was hit by an allegedly stolen truck that he had pulled over Saturday morning

David and Collet Stephan leave for a break during an appeal hearing in Calgary on Thursday, March 9, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Todd Korol
Appeal Court rejects stay for Alberta couple facing third trial in son’s death

Pair accused in their earlier trials of not seeking medical attention for their son sooner

Highway notices like this come down effective June 14. Public health restrictions on non-essential travel and commercial operation have hit local businesses in every corner of B.C. (B.C. government)
Province-wide travel back on in B.C.’s COVID-19 restart plan

Gathering changes include up to 50 people for outdoor events

Most Read