Cancer Society travel treatment fund can help

To the editor;

In light of the Greyhound bus lines reducing service in British Columbia, the Canadian Cancer Society (CCS) wants to take the opportunity to reach out to any people living with cancer who may be impacted by this withdrawal of service.

No matter where you live, CCS is here to ensure that no Canadian has to face cancer alone.

Like other British Columbians, we were concerned when we learned of Greyhound’s decision to reduce service in the province.

We know the bus service provided transportation for people facing cancer who had to travel from rural areas to larger city centres for treatment at a lower cost than other transit options.

If you need us, regardless of where you live, here’s how we’re ensuring you don’t have to face cancer alone:

In some communities in B.C., CCS is partnered with the Freemasons Cancer Car Program to help people with cancer receive rides to and from primary cancer treatment appointments, such as chemotherapy and radiation.

Our travel treatment fund can help by providing financial assistance for low income individuals who need to travel for cancer treatment.

Additionally, if you need to fly to treatment, CCS continues to connect people with cancer with Hope Air, which provides free travel for people with cancer who meet their eligibility guidelines (see www.hopeair.ca for more information.)

We understand a cancer diagnosis can make you feel alone and raise many questions and concerns, whether you are living with cancer yourself or caring for someone who is.

CCS also offers a number of non-transportation related programs to help support Canadians living with cancer.

Through our Cancer Information Service, CCS can connect you with cancer information specialists who can answer your questions and provide reliable cancer information.

If you’d like to speak with someone who has been through a similar cancer experience to you, then our Peer Match program will pair you with a trained volunteer who can provide you with the support you need.

You can also join our online community – CancerConnection.ca – if you have cancer or are caring for a loved one with cancer and want to connect with people going through similar experiences. And if you’d like to offer support to people with cancer in your community, CCS offers peer support group facilitator training to help start and sustain community support groups.

No matter where you are or what type of cancer you’re facing, CCS is here for you. For more information on any of the programs or services, or if you have any questions about cancer, please call us at 1-888-939-3333 or visit cancer.ca.

Andrea Seale, Executive Director,

Canadian Cancer Society British Columbia & Yukon

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