Students leave class for snowshoe trails

The NTRS partnered with the Barriere Secondary school several years ago to bring more outdoor activities to students

Grade 8 students from Barriere Secondary recently learned how to snow shoe  with NT Recreation Society members at the Barriere Forks Trails.

Grade 8 students from Barriere Secondary recently learned how to snow shoe with NT Recreation Society members at the Barriere Forks Trails.

North Thompson Recreation Society

Barriere Secondary grade 8 students recently had the opportunity to leave their classrooms for a few hours and try out the new snowshoes were purchased by the North Thompson Recreation Society (NTRS).   NTRS members Doug Davis, Norm Veitch and Lloyd Abbey guided the group through marked snowshoe trails that weaved in and around the forest at the Barriere Forks Trails.  The students seemed to enjoy their new snowshoeing experience.

The NTRS partnered with the Barriere Secondary school several years ago to bring more outdoor activities to students, and to give students the opportunity to experience new things that they might not otherwise have the chance to do.

“We initially started our program with cross country skiing, and now, thanks to the 911 Golf Tournament grant that we received early in the year, we were able to purchase 20 sets of snowshoes for the students to use,” said NTRS program coordinator Mary MacLennan.

Snowshoeing is becoming a favorite pastime for many winter enthusiasts because one can go out and enjoy the outdoors at their own pace, it is low risk and the health benefits are great.

Stride for stride, snowshoeing in powder snow on level terrain typically burns at least 45 percent more calories than walking at the same pace.

Snowshoes are footwear designed for walking over the snow.  Snowshoes work by distributing the weight of the person over a larger area so that the person’s foot does not sink completely into the snow, a quality called “flotation”.  The traditional webbed snowshoes have direct origins to the indigenous people, and had hardwood frames with rawhide lacing.  The more modern snowshoes are made of lightweight metals and plastic.

 

“It’s great  watching the students develop confidence in their abilities, and to know you are teaching them skills they will have for life.  Snowshoeing is just another great way to keep kids moving,” said MacLennan.